Home Charging Still Fundamental to EV Satisfaction

By · October 29, 2019


The Connected Charge Station from Ford is a smart charger that can be controlled remotely through the its mobile app.

The home EV charging market continues to evolve with charging station operators and automakers destined to play an even greater role in satisfying EV drivers’ need to recharge at home. Ahead of unveiling new plug-in vehicles later this year, Ford in October announced a new home charger as well as agreements to enable Ford drivers to roam across multiple networks.

With every PEV sold, Ford is providing a self-branded Mobile Charger that can connect to 120 or 240v outlets, offering up to an estimated 22 miles per hour of charge. This should satisfy most EV drivers’ residential requirements, which could limit the number of dedicated home chargers sold to Ford customers. For the power hungry, Ford will offer the Connected Charge Station, a smart charger that can be controlled remotely through the FordPass mobile app, and maxes out at 32 miles of range per hour. OEMs such as Ford

Electrify America, which is partnering with Ford in its EV charging network access plan, also recently announced its first foray into home charging with a $500 home charger. The 7.6 kW charger includes WiFi connection and is being sold via Amazon. The home EV charging market continues to evolve with charging station operators and OEMs destined to play an even greater role in satisfying EV drivers’ need to recharge at home.

Home charging remains the primary charging location for most EV drivers, according to a 2018 survey of PlugShare EV drivers. Taken from a PlugInsights panel of more than 23,000 EV drivers, the study found that only 5.3% of EV owners do not have access to home charging, and 36% of EV owners connected to a wall outlet rather than a dedicated home charger. (PlugShare is currently rerunning the survey for 2019, so stay tuned).

Automakers want EVs to equally appeal to people who don’t have access to home charging such as those who live in multi-unit dwellings (MUD), but according to the survey, 84.6% of EV drivers live in single-family homes. Additional solutions are needed to address the MUD audience, which represents 68% of EV drivers who don’t charge at home.

Agreements such as those tying up Ford, Electrify America and Greenlots that enable more seamless public charging will give greater confidence to current and prospective EV owners. Being be able to get the power flow started without signing up for a new subscription or similar types of delays is critical to EV driver satisfaction and the word of mouth that will grow the market. Workplace charging is available to 38.6% of the drivers we surveyed, and of those who can charge at work, 10.7% have never tried it, perhaps because they could inexpensively charge at home.

While the EV market has softened from its continuing accelerating growth, satisfaction among EV owners remains high. Testifying to happy EV lifestyle is that 15.5% of EV drivers we polled live in a house with more than 1 EV. While considerable investment is being made in public charging, when it comes to keeping your EV charged, for now there’s no place like home.

New to EVs? Start here

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